As a homeowner, you’re constantly faced with a variety of spending decisions, many of which could improve the quality of your life or just put a strain on your budget. The challenge is to monitor your cash flow, anticipate your family’s needs, and avoid spending more than you can afford. There’s a goal that’s much easier said than done!

Although managing one’s budget is based on personal priorities and financial resources, it’s often useful to consider feedback and perspectives from other homeowners. The following thoughts are based on the experiences of one such homeowner.

  • Tool sheds are not an absolute necessity for most people, but they can be extremely helpful in protecting your yard equipment and keeping your property looking neat. If you own a riding mower, for example, there may not be space in your garage to store it. For those who own a backyard swimming pool, a shed can be very useful for storing pool chemicals, maintenance equipment, and pool toys. While a tool shed can set you back a few hundred dollars or more, getting one on your property will make your yard look nicer and keep your tools, chemicals, and machinery in a safer, more secure place.
  • Many people are aware that a basement dehumidifier can remove excess moisture and help prevent the growth of mold. This is especially important if you’re storing anything of value in your basement, such as old books, important documents, clothing, framed art, or collectables. Since basement humidifiers vary in price from a couple hundred dollars to well over $1,000, some homeowners postpone buying them. However, when you factor in the potential cost of mold remediation and having to throw away belongings that get damaged by moisture and mold, the cost is much more justifiable. If you’re fortunate enough to have a dry basement with a humidity level of less than 50%, then a dehumidifier may be an unnecessary purchase. If you want to be sure, though, you can buy a cheap humidity gauge for $10 or $20 — either online or at a local hardware store.
  • A ceiling fan may seem like a frivolous expense for a screened in porch, but you’ll be mighty glad you have one on hot, humid days! You might think that large window screens would provide ample circulation for an outdoor porch, but unless there’s a breeze — either natural or man made — then that hot air will often just sit there and linger, much like a guest who has overstayed their welcome! A ceiling fan can pull that uncomfortable air away from you and stir up some much-needed circulation. Ceiling fans, which typically cost between $100 and $200 (plus installation) — create both the look and feel of a cool, breezy environment. They also help reduce air conditioning costs inside your home.

Since everyone’s personal needs, budgets, and lifestyles are different, there are a lot of factors that come into play when deciding whether to purchase (or postpone) any of these three items. Hopefully, this blog post has provided you with some helpful insights on making those decisions!

Tagged with:
 

Making daily choices to help conserve water is a win win. Reducing the amount of water used in your home will help protect our world’s natural resource and save you money at the same time. Best of all, most of the ways to save are either free or very inexpensive, and will save you hundreds of dollars every year.

Here are some water saving tips that are friendly to both your wallet and the environment:

Turn off the faucets. Don’t run the water while you are shaving, shampooing your hair, washing dishes, or brushing your teeth. Did you know turning off the water while brushing your teeth can save you over 25 gallons of water every month?

Fill up the sink when doing the dishes. Put soap on one side and rinse water on the other side of the sink or use a plastic rinse bin. This will save you gallons of water every time you clean. If you use a dishwasher, always run full loads.

Don’t do laundry unless you have to. Always run a full load in the washing machine. You can also reuse towels to save on filing up the laundry basket.

Don’t use the toilet as a wastebasket. Every time you flush a bug, tissue or trash down the toilet you waste five to seven gallons of water.

Bring your car to the car wash. Commercial car washes often use recycled water.

Cover pools, spas, and hot tubs when not in use. This will help prevent evaporation of water.

If you must water your lawn make sure to do it early in the day so you don’t lose water to evaporation.

Mulch your plants. Placing mulch around your plants will help keep them retain moisture.

Water conservation will have you saving money on your utility bill and also prevents water pollution in nearby lakes, rivers and local watersheds.

 

 

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.